Flower Power: 6 Famous Flower Scenes in Ballet

April showers bring May flowers…What’s your favorite ballet flower scene? Here are some memorable ones:

Rose Adagio—The Sleeping Beauty

Are flowers the way the to the heart? Not in this case. Princess Aurora doesn’t find true love with any of her rose-bearing suitors, but her dance with them is one of the most famous in all of ballet.

Garland Waltz—The Sleeping Beauty

Flowers, flowers everywhere! Presumably the village people didn’t suffer from allergies. Or perhaps some good fairy freed them from that curse… (This clip doesn’t show the entire stage, but I do like the close-up view of the Mariinsky’s version.)

Lilac Fairy’s Variation—The Sleeping Beauty

What floral-inspired magical creature saves the day and rocks a purple wig at the same time? The Lilac Fairy, of course! But, before all of the drama—a dance.

“He Loves Me, He Loves Me Not…”—Giselle

Spoiler alert: the flower tells the truth.

Le Jardin Animé—Le Corsaire

If you didn’t get enough flowers in the “Garland Waltz,” this scene in Le Cosaire basically blossoms into balletic botanical garden.

Waltz of the Flowers—The Nutcracker

Beautiful any time of year… Besides, there’s a good chance this music dances through your head all year anyway.

 

The Impact of the Color of Costumes on Balanchine’s Waltz of the Flowers…

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Wikimedia Commons Public Domain Image.

Balanchine’s Waltz of the Flowers is my favorite version of this dance I’ve seen thus far. In my 2015 artsBHAM review of Alabama Ballet‘s production I wrote:

“The “Waltz of the Flowers” is the choreographic highlight of the ballet — a continual folding and unfolding, circling and whirling, drawing together and drifting apart. […] In Dewdrop, Balanchine may well have created the most choreographically memorable character in the ballet with her springing, gliding, at-home-in-the-air movements.”

Beyond the masterful choreography, the color of the costumes and the warmth or coolness or exuberance or reserve or anything in between that their palette evokes unavoidably plays a role in the overall impact of the dance.

Here are videos of different wardrobe interpretations of the Waltz of the Flowers from six productions of Balanchine’s Nutcracker. (Not among these videos are Alabama Ballet since their costumes are based on the Karinska designs used by New York City Ballet and Royal Danish Ballet because I couldn’t find a clip of their Waltz of Flowers, but here’s a photo.)

What do these hues suggest to you? What do they help highlight in the music and choreography? Which do you like best? Or least? Are there colors that you think would work better? Let me know your thoughts in the comments…

New York City Ballet

Pacific Northwest Ballet

Miami City Ballet

Oregon Ballet Theatre

Pennsylvania Ballet

Central Pennsylvania Youth Ballet

Fun Fact: The Link Between the Waltz of the Flowers and The Sleeping Beauty

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Nutcracker Act II set design from 1892. Wikimedia Commons Public Domain Image.

“Can’t repeat the past?” he cried incredulously. “Why of course you can!”

–  The Great Gatsby, F. Scott Fitzgerald

Whether you agree with Mr. Gatsby or not, the idea of repeating the past was the game plan for choreographer Marius Petipa during the creation of the Waltz of the Flowers for the very first Nutcracker in 1892…

The past that Petipa was seeking to repeat was the recent past–his previous collaboration with composer Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky in 1890 on a ballet known as The Sleeping Beauty.

Dance writer and critic Robert Greskovic explains:

“Tchaikovsky composed a lush, expansive waltz for what Petipa planned as a re-creation of the similarly grand number he staged for the “Valse Villageoise” in Sleeping Beauty two years earlier.” (Ballet 101, p. 266)

“Valse Villageoise” is, of course, the “Village Waltz” a.k.a. “Garland Waltz” a.k.a. Disney’s inspiration for the song, “Once Upon a Dream.”

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Photo by Rachel Hellwig.

Petipa gave Tchaikovsky detailed guidelines about the structure of each scene in The Nutcracker and the accompanying music he desired him to compose. His outline for the Waltz of the Flowers is as follows:

“Seventh Dance.
Valse des Fleurs with large garlands.
8 bars for the start of the waltz, then, the
 same amount of bars as in the rural waltz
in The Sleeping Beauty (second scene).
The little man claps his hands and 36 danseurs
and 36 danseuses appear, dressed
like flowers who carry a large bouquet
and present it to the Prince and his Bride.
As soon as this is done, the dancers, as is
usual in operas, take their positions and
begin to dance.”

(The Nutcracker Ballet by Jack Anderson, p. 38)

What might this have looked like on stage?

Perhaps something like the clip below from a Staatsballett Berlin production that drew upon the 1892 costume and set designs as well as historic choreographic records…However, this Nutcracker is certainly not a “reconstruction.” As critic Ilona Landgraf explains about the surviving notation of The Nutcracker’s choreography:

“[…] the snag is that Stepanov recorded only the big, complex group dances and poses. Missing are transitions and other crucial specifics.”

Still, this video offers an interesting glimpse at a vision of the Waltz of the Flowers that’s very different than interpretations we are used to seeing today.

Can you, as a modern balletomane, disassociate the garland imagery in this Tchaikovsky waltz from its more famous use in The Sleeping Beauty?

Moreover, does the Waltz of the Flowers live up to the Village Waltz? Does it surpass it? Did Petipa and Tchaikovsky succeed in repeating the past? Let me know your thoughts in the comments…